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6 Slurp-Worthy Ramen Stops in Charleston

Dip into a bowl of comfort

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Charleston isn't exactly a hot spot of ramen activity, but when a craving for noodles hits, it must be filled. With colder weather on the way (maybe), seek out these options for shoyu, tonkotsu, and other non-conventional noodle dishes. From pop-ups to gas station shops, ramen lovers can find a few around town, if they look hard enough.

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Ko Cha

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Korean restaurant Ko Cha sits in a gas station with about seven tables and a very extensive menu of bulgogi and bibimbap, but if you're looking for noodles, the kitchen can satisfy those cravings. The presentation is unfussy with chicken broth and instant noodles, but you can dress it up with extra cucumber and cabbage kimchi.

Most patrons go to Kanpai for the sushi, but the Mount Pleasant restaurant also offers a variety of ramens. Choose from soy, chashu, tonkotsu, and miso bowls from chef Sean Park.

Warehouse

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Warehouse has a build-your-own sort of ramen program. Choose alkaline or rice noodles, beef or miso broth, and a large selection of proteins. There’s a wealth of combinations, plus a full bar of craft beer and fun cocktails.

Warehouse/Facebook

2 Nixons at Proof

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Ramen pop-up 2 Nixons finally has a set location at Upper King bar Proof on Wednesdays, Fridays, and Sundays. Find chef Jeffrey Stoneberger and his bowls while sipping a cocktail from bartender Craig Nelson. The ramen combinations are always changing, so once week you might get Benton’s bacon and local shrimp shio ramen and the next week it will be blue crab ramen.

One of the last holdouts for noodle bowls downtown, CO offers a Vietnamese ramen with pork belly, shredded pork, poached egg, bok choy, and egg noodles in a pork broth. Cozy up to the counter, order a bowl, and watch the crowds on Lower King go by.

CO

Chico Feo

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Funky Folly shack Chico Feo serves up noodle bowls in the evenings. It's a porky broth with slices of meat, bok choy, an egg, and other glorious accoutrements. Look for the Wu-Tang bowl once the weather gets cold.

Ko Cha

Korean restaurant Ko Cha sits in a gas station with about seven tables and a very extensive menu of bulgogi and bibimbap, but if you're looking for noodles, the kitchen can satisfy those cravings. The presentation is unfussy with chicken broth and instant noodles, but you can dress it up with extra cucumber and cabbage kimchi.

Kanpai

Most patrons go to Kanpai for the sushi, but the Mount Pleasant restaurant also offers a variety of ramens. Choose from soy, chashu, tonkotsu, and miso bowls from chef Sean Park.

Warehouse

Warehouse/Facebook

Warehouse has a build-your-own sort of ramen program. Choose alkaline or rice noodles, beef or miso broth, and a large selection of proteins. There’s a wealth of combinations, plus a full bar of craft beer and fun cocktails.

Warehouse/Facebook

2 Nixons at Proof

Ramen pop-up 2 Nixons finally has a set location at Upper King bar Proof on Wednesdays, Fridays, and Sundays. Find chef Jeffrey Stoneberger and his bowls while sipping a cocktail from bartender Craig Nelson. The ramen combinations are always changing, so once week you might get Benton’s bacon and local shrimp shio ramen and the next week it will be blue crab ramen.

CO

CO

One of the last holdouts for noodle bowls downtown, CO offers a Vietnamese ramen with pork belly, shredded pork, poached egg, bok choy, and egg noodles in a pork broth. Cozy up to the counter, order a bowl, and watch the crowds on Lower King go by.

CO

Chico Feo

Funky Folly shack Chico Feo serves up noodle bowls in the evenings. It's a porky broth with slices of meat, bok choy, an egg, and other glorious accoutrements. Look for the Wu-Tang bowl once the weather gets cold.

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