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The Grocery Piggy Plate: jwkpec.com
The Grocery Piggy Plate: jwkpec.com

15 Charleston Charcuterie Boards to Order Right Now

Meat!

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The Grocery Piggy Plate: jwkpec.com

Making a meat plate is an art, and there's such a large selection of restaurants in Charleston, doing it well, it's hard to choose which to consume. In an attempt to narrow down where to go for slices of sausage, prosciutto, and pâtés, Eater looks at some of the more popular charcuterie places around town. Check the list, try it out, and then report on your favorites. Did we miss someone? Post it in the comments.

Selections are listed in alphabetical order.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Bin 152

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With just meat, cheese, and bread, Bin 152's offerings are the most simplistic on the peninsula. No mustard, no pickles, no worries. It's quaint and perfect for the European wine bar surroundings.

Cypress

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Cypress chef Craig Deihl is the only person in town to win awards (Good Food Awards) for his charcuterie program. Do you need more convincing? He prepares the pigs upstairs and cures everything in-house. Don't second guess these artisan meats.

Edmund's Oast

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Chef Reid Henninger makes the charcuterie treats in-house, butchering whole hogs and curing the items above the dining room — feel free to stare down your meat before ordering. Go for the large portion if there's any chance of sharing.

Slightly North of Broad

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With mustards, relishes, cornichons, pâtés, and slices of cured meats, the charcuterie plate at Slightly North of Broad has everything. Chef Frank Lee is one of the culinary originators in Charleston, so patrons should trust him with their meat choices.

The Belmont

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The Belmont might be known for their cocktails, but they make a mean meat (and cheese) plate as well. Patrons get several options to choose from, but the fun is in the accoutrements. Selections come with sides of olive oil, onion jam, spicy mustard, cured olives, pickled okra, and spicy green beans.

The Granary

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Some slices of meat, some crusty bread, a smattering of pickles—what more could you want? You're safe in chef Brannon Florie's hands. Florie ages the meat beside the restaurant's dining room, so you can peer upon your selections before consumption.

The Grocery

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Delectable meats are served on a pig-shaped cutting board at The Grocery. Patrons who order the "Piggy Plate" will delight in items like house-made hams, mortadella, and pâtés served with pickled vegetables, crostini, and whole grain mustard.

The Lot

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The charcuterie plate at The Lot changes up, but patrons can look for country pâté, head cheese, or smoked ham to make an appearance with pickles, mustard, and bread. The menu is constantly changing, but you can usually find the meat plate on the lineup.

The Macintosh

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Start your meal at The Macintosh with the butcher's plate. The house-made offerings will range from Cheerwine-glazed pork belly to duck rillette, but the outcome is always the same — mouth watering meat in your mouth. Served with toasted bread and tangy pickles, it's enough to share.

Trattoria Lucca

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Fill your antipasti plate with cured meats at Trattoria Lucca. Though, chef Ken Vedrinski does some wonderful vegetable too, if you're inclined. There's a large selection of traditional Italian meats available, like finochietta, capicola, or soppressata.

Two Boroughs Larder

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The Two Boroughs Larder charcuterie board has some heft. Offerings vary, but the plate could include large slices of different types of pâtés (the country version and the super smooth chicken liver) and wheels of grilled sausages. Smears of mustards, a sprinkling of pickles, and crusty bread round out the dish.

Artisan Meat Share

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Artisan Meat Share makes all the meats in house, so you know their charcuterie is top notch. Bring a few friends and order the Motherboard — you'll have more meat than you know what to do with.

Goat. Sheep. Cow.

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Goat. Sheep. Cow. isn't a restaurant, but you can call ahead with price specifications, likes and dislikes, and party size, and they'll whip up one of the best charcuterie boards around. If you're a cheese fan, this fromagerie can add plenty of delicacies to accompany your meats.

Tavern & Table

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If you like views of the water while getting down on some charcuterie, then stop by Table & Tavern on Shem Creek for a housemade plate of meat. The restaurant serves its butcher boards with red pepper jelly, stout mustard, and rustic bread.

Ted's Butcherblock

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Meatery Ted's Butcherblock offers a wealth of salamis, pates, and rillettes from its cases. Choose the small for two people or the medium for a heartier meal.

Bin 152

With just meat, cheese, and bread, Bin 152's offerings are the most simplistic on the peninsula. No mustard, no pickles, no worries. It's quaint and perfect for the European wine bar surroundings.

Cypress

Cypress chef Craig Deihl is the only person in town to win awards (Good Food Awards) for his charcuterie program. Do you need more convincing? He prepares the pigs upstairs and cures everything in-house. Don't second guess these artisan meats.

Edmund's Oast

Chef Reid Henninger makes the charcuterie treats in-house, butchering whole hogs and curing the items above the dining room — feel free to stare down your meat before ordering. Go for the large portion if there's any chance of sharing.

Slightly North of Broad

With mustards, relishes, cornichons, pâtés, and slices of cured meats, the charcuterie plate at Slightly North of Broad has everything. Chef Frank Lee is one of the culinary originators in Charleston, so patrons should trust him with their meat choices.

The Belmont

The Belmont might be known for their cocktails, but they make a mean meat (and cheese) plate as well. Patrons get several options to choose from, but the fun is in the accoutrements. Selections come with sides of olive oil, onion jam, spicy mustard, cured olives, pickled okra, and spicy green beans.

The Granary

Some slices of meat, some crusty bread, a smattering of pickles—what more could you want? You're safe in chef Brannon Florie's hands. Florie ages the meat beside the restaurant's dining room, so you can peer upon your selections before consumption.

The Grocery

Delectable meats are served on a pig-shaped cutting board at The Grocery. Patrons who order the "Piggy Plate" will delight in items like house-made hams, mortadella, and pâtés served with pickled vegetables, crostini, and whole grain mustard.

The Lot

The charcuterie plate at The Lot changes up, but patrons can look for country pâté, head cheese, or smoked ham to make an appearance with pickles, mustard, and bread. The menu is constantly changing, but you can usually find the meat plate on the lineup.

The Macintosh

Start your meal at The Macintosh with the butcher's plate. The house-made offerings will range from Cheerwine-glazed pork belly to duck rillette, but the outcome is always the same — mouth watering meat in your mouth. Served with toasted bread and tangy pickles, it's enough to share.

Trattoria Lucca

Fill your antipasti plate with cured meats at Trattoria Lucca. Though, chef Ken Vedrinski does some wonderful vegetable too, if you're inclined. There's a large selection of traditional Italian meats available, like finochietta, capicola, or soppressata.

Two Boroughs Larder

The Two Boroughs Larder charcuterie board has some heft. Offerings vary, but the plate could include large slices of different types of pâtés (the country version and the super smooth chicken liver) and wheels of grilled sausages. Smears of mustards, a sprinkling of pickles, and crusty bread round out the dish.

Artisan Meat Share

Artisan Meat Share makes all the meats in house, so you know their charcuterie is top notch. Bring a few friends and order the Motherboard — you'll have more meat than you know what to do with.

Goat. Sheep. Cow.

Goat. Sheep. Cow. isn't a restaurant, but you can call ahead with price specifications, likes and dislikes, and party size, and they'll whip up one of the best charcuterie boards around. If you're a cheese fan, this fromagerie can add plenty of delicacies to accompany your meats.

Tavern & Table