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12 Iconic Meaty Meat Dishes in Charleston

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Many times when folks visit Charleston, the first question is "Where can I get good seafood?" Well, forget that, because this is The Five Days of Meat, and sometimes nothing but a hunk of land roving animal flesh will do. Eater went in search of some of the iconic or signature dishes served at Lowcountry restaurants that keep patrons coming back for their beef/pork/poultry needs.

These plates are the go-to orders when entering the eatery in search of meat. You know it will usually be on the menu and it will always satisfy the lust for flesh. If you're noticing a lack of burgers or charcuterie, it's because Eater is running separate maps for those items this week. And if we missed your favorite dish, let us know.


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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Burwell's Stone Fire Grill

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At Burwell's you can choose to sear your own meat. They offer a 700 degree tableside stone on which patrons can cook cuts of cow. The "Beef 101" option features bistro filet, NY strip, Wagyu beef, and filet mignon.

Cypress

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Order the thick-cut, bone-in pork chop at Cypress. In chef Craig Deihl's hands, this ubiquitous cut is turned into something magical. You're sure to dismiss any preconceived notions of pork chops as dry and boring.

EVO Pizzeria

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EVO is a Lowcountry pizza institution. Their best seller is the Pork Trifecta—it's a thin crust sausage, pepperoni and bacon feast. Die-hard fans of the pie even have their own t-shirts and bumper stickers.
Forget what you know about chicken livers, the pâté at FIG will make you weak in the knees. Chef Mike Lata had this to say about the dish to Food & Wine: "We use a really old-school process that isn’t used very often, where we emulsify the pork fatback and the chicken livers with bacon. It is as smooth as smooth can be. The pork fat balances out the chicken livers so perfectly. It almost tastes closer to foie gras than chicken livers. It’s really ethereal."

Hall's Chophouse

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There's not many places you can get an old fashioned slice of prime rib these days, but Hall's Chophouse will plate one up for you. Delicate, slow cooked, and succulent, this throwback is best ordered with a dirty martini.

Hometeam BBQ

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This snack isn't your regular bar staple. The smoked wings at Hometeam BBQ are a masterfully concocted dish of sweet and savory. The chicken is brined, tossed in a brown sugar rub, and then smoked over red oak for hours. The result is a sort of confited wing, which is then flash fried to caramelize the skin. Instead of the typical ranch or blue cheese, this dish is served with an Alabama white sauce.
There's no lack of pork product at Husk, and the most simple and iconic treatment might be the large “Surryano” ham behind the bar. If you're feeling peckish while imbibing, ask the bartender to shave you off a few slices. The ham pairs superbly well with bourbon.

Oak Steakhouse

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Go big and go for the 24 ounce dry-aged Certified Angus Beef Prime bone-in ribeye at Oak Steakhouse. If you're being a complete glutton, also order the fried lobster and foie gras to throw on top.

Red Drum

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Red Drum captures the flavors of the South and the Southwest with their South Carolina quail and Texas venison sausage dish. The combination of meats, along with the chile cheddar grit skillet, is a winner.

The Lot

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Though the menu changes daily, the bavette steak makes multiple appearances at The Lot. Recently, it was served with potato puree, green beans, carrots, and an herb butter. This cut isn't seen in restaurants often, but chef Alex Lira likes to keep it in the day's specials.

The Macintosh

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The Macintosh and chef Jeremiah Bacon have kept deckle on the menu since day one. Two years ago, the ribeye cut was relatively unknown, but now you'll find it on several menus across town. The beef is usually served with fresh, seasonal produce.

Wild Olive

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The presentation is pared-down, but the grilled grass-fed steak with smashed, fried, and truffled Yukon gold potatoes at Wild Olive proves that sometimes simple is best. The cut changes, but the perfection remains.

Burwell's Stone Fire Grill

At Burwell's you can choose to sear your own meat. They offer a 700 degree tableside stone on which patrons can cook cuts of cow. The "Beef 101" option features bistro filet, NY strip, Wagyu beef, and filet mignon.

Cypress

Order the thick-cut, bone-in pork chop at Cypress. In chef Craig Deihl's hands, this ubiquitous cut is turned into something magical. You're sure to dismiss any preconceived notions of pork chops as dry and boring.

EVO Pizzeria

EVO is a Lowcountry pizza institution. Their best seller is the Pork Trifecta—it's a thin crust sausage, pepperoni and bacon feast. Die-hard fans of the pie even have their own t-shirts and bumper stickers.

FIG

Forget what you know about chicken livers, the pâté at FIG will make you weak in the knees. Chef Mike Lata had this to say about the dish to Food & Wine: "We use a really old-school process that isn’t used very often, where we emulsify the pork fatback and the chicken livers with bacon. It is as smooth as smooth can be. The pork fat balances out the chicken livers so perfectly. It almost tastes closer to foie gras than chicken livers. It’s really ethereal."

Hall's Chophouse

There's not many places you can get an old fashioned slice of prime rib these days, but Hall's Chophouse will plate one up for you. Delicate, slow cooked, and succulent, this throwback is best ordered with a dirty martini.

Hometeam BBQ

This snack isn't your regular bar staple. The smoked wings at Hometeam BBQ are a masterfully concocted dish of sweet and savory. The chicken is brined, tossed in a brown sugar rub, and then smoked over red oak for hours. The result is a sort of confited wing, which is then flash fried to caramelize the skin. Instead of the typical ranch or blue cheese, this dish is served with an Alabama white sauce.

Husk

There's no lack of pork product at Husk, and the most simple and iconic treatment might be the large “Surryano” ham behind the bar. If you're feeling peckish while imbibing, ask the bartender to shave you off a few slices. The ham pairs superbly well with bourbon.

Oak Steakhouse

Go big and go for the 24 ounce dry-aged Certified Angus Beef Prime bone-in ribeye at Oak Steakhouse. If you're being a complete glutton, also order the fried lobster and foie gras to throw on top.

Red Drum

Red Drum captures the flavors of the South and the Southwest with their South Carolina quail and Texas venison sausage dish. The combination of meats, along with the chile cheddar grit skillet, is a winner.

The Lot

Though the menu changes daily, the bavette steak makes multiple appearances at The Lot. Recently, it was served with potato puree, green beans, carrots, and an herb butter. This cut isn't seen in restaurants often, but chef Alex Lira likes to keep it in the day's specials.

The Macintosh

The Macintosh and chef Jeremiah Bacon have kept deckle on the menu since day one. Two years ago, the ribeye cut was relatively unknown, but now you'll find it on several menus across town. The beef is usually served with fresh, seasonal produce.

Wild Olive

The presentation is pared-down, but the grilled grass-fed steak with smashed, fried, and truffled Yukon gold potatoes at Wild Olive proves that sometimes simple is best. The cut changes, but the perfection remains.

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